Posts Tagged ‘Acadia’

Biking Acadia Sargent Mountain Loop

One of my favorite carriage road bike trips in Acadia is the Sargent Mountain Loop.  There are numerous ways to access this loop, my personal favorite is to start at the parking lot at the carriage house just up the hill from Northeast Harbor on the right – to me there is a little more downhill going this way around the loop, and the uphill portion is shorter but more strenuous.   Either way involves a fair amount of biking uphill.  It is also worth your while if you have the time and the energy to stop at one of the many trails you’ll pass leading up to the summit.  There is a small pond up there that is a great place to take a quick swim ( watch out for the leeches) and interestingly you will be swimming in what is likely the first pond in Maine that existed as the glaciers retreated during the ice age; Sargent Mountain Pond first pond in Maine.

 

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Hiking Acadia National Park: The Triad

Starting from the carriage road above Wildwood Stables it is only  .9 miles to the summit of the Triad with spectacular views of the islands off of Seal Harbor and the Western Way.  It’s a fairly steep hike but not very long.

Biking Acadia Day Mountain Loop

 

There are several places to enter the carriage road and run the Day Mountain loop.  For this particular ride,  I started at the entrance to Wildwood Stables – there is a small parking area just after you turn onto the Stanley Brook road to park your car.  It is a nice trip with great views as you loop around the mountain.  The trip to the summit is well worth the energy, and you can stop for a hike to see Day Mountain Caves.   The summit is a great place to have lunch, and enjoy the downhill ride back.  Note that in the heart of summer this loop is heavily traveled by horse and carriage from the stables and can become a little bumpy and you’ll be dodging horse poop, but still worth the ride!

 

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Secrets of Acadia The Boyd Road

Everyone that fishes has a secret spot where they go to fish. A spot that they found on their own, or through a family member, that belongs to them and where nobody else goes. Mine lies in the heart of Acadia National Park. It was found by my Grandfather who showed my Dad how to get there, and when I was old enough to go Dad took me. It is also a magic spot. I can go there today and bring home a fish for you. It is also magic because my Dad brought me there, and told me to keep it a secret, which I have and still will. The secret spot will never change, as it’s within a National Park. It will be there, as it is now and as I know it now, until the end of time. The spirit at this spot belongs to my family.

Acadia is one of the most visited National Parks, and as of 2007 was logging upwards of 2 million recreational visits per year. With that many people visiting such a relatively small park, you would think that all of its secrets would be uncovered, but despite the multitude of maps and guidebooks, there are still places that few get to visit, or know about. I’ve been visiting, living on, and exploring Mount Desert Island and Acadia National Park for the past 43 years, and I’ve come across and explored some unique spots. While I’m not ready to give out my secret fishing spots in Acadia, I will divulge some of its secret places worth a visit that you may not find on any trail map or guide. Let’s go visit some of them.

THE BOYD ROAD

The Boyd road as it is locally known lies between the villages of Seal Harbor and Otter Creek.  Traveling from Otter Creek to Seal Harbor it is on the right hand side of the road about a ½ a mile or so from Blackwoods Campground, and just before you get to the stone bridge where Rt3 goes over the Ocean Drive.  It is not marked in any way, just a dirt road that is gated just inside the treeline. It is currently home to the firing range for Acadia National Park rangers, and is signed as such.  Rarely are the Rangers in there shooting and when they are, they flip a portion of the sign down saying that the range is active, and of course you can hear them when they are there, which is usually late afternoon.  The road is well kept up until the firing range, where it then narrows to a path that is easy to follow, but becomes increasingly narrow and harder to find the further you go, and ends up coming out at Bubble Pond.  The area for some reason always reminds me of Colorado or another similar western state, it just has that feeling about it.  The history that I have of the road is mostly anecdotal, I can’t really find any source online that has information – so this is my little history, which is probably mostly true.  I always had the notion that it was created as a firebreak for the fire of ’47, which my Father fought in. Apparently it was used as a firebreak, but existed as a road beforehand that was a way to get to Bar Harbor before Acadia National Park was established. It was known as the Boyd road because a family named Boyd lived up in there way back when, probably where the firing range is now I would suspect – it’s a beautiful area.  Speaking of the ’47 fire there seems to be conflicting evidence of it’s ignition site – I always thought it was Dollivers dump – which the Park history has as the origin.  Acadia NP has the fire’s history here.

However, there are some accounts that have it starting in a cranberry bog in Salisbury Cove (locally know as Kings Creek). Personally I believe the Dollivers dump version and that is supported by my parents and is the story I’ve always heard.   The road comes out at the carriage road just above Bubble Pond, and would be very hard to find coming in from that side unless you knew what you were looking for, and knew where it was.  It’s much easier to start from the Otter Creek end.  It would not be possible to bicycle it, but it is a pleasant walk (about 2.5 miles one way)  and one that you can think about the Boyd’s and the great fire of ’47 while your walking along.

This is how the end of the road looks, standing on the carriage road above Bubble Pond.

Boyd Road (right) where it meets the carriage road above Bubble Pond – you can almost see the water through the trees.

A handful of people a year hit a story on this blog by using the search terms Secrets of Acadia.  When I first thought about writing down some of  the secrets in Acadia that I have discovered over the years I thought about spending the winter putting them all into book form and either finding a publisher for it, or publishing it myself.  I’ve been thinking about it, and I think it makes more sense to publish it here.  When you the reader find it here on this obscure blog, it means you really want to know the Secrets of Acadia… you didn’t just think about it because you saw the book on a shelf.  And that means something to me, and it is the essence of sharing a secret.  I’m sharing it with you, and now it’s our secret.  Please guard it well and if this helped you in any way, if you visit and find the experience rewarding, please consider making a small donation below.

 

 

 

Secrets of Acadia Little Long Pond

Everyone that fishes has a secret spot where they go to fish.  A spot that they found on their own, or through a family member, that belongs to them and where nobody else goes.   Mine lies in the heart of Acadia National Park.   It was found by my Grandfather who showed my Dad how to get there, and when  I was old enough to go Dad took me.   It is also a magic spot.  I can go there today and bring home a fish for you.  It is also magic because my Dad brought me there, and told me to keep it a secret, which I have and still will.  The secret spot will never change, as it’s within a National Park.  It will be there, as it is now and as I know it now, until the end of time.  The spirit at this spot belongs to my family.

Acadia is one of the most visited National Parks, and as of 2007 was logging upwards of  2 million recreational visits per year.  With that many people visiting such a relatively small park, you would think that all of its secrets would be uncovered, but despite the multitude of maps and guidebooks, there are still places that few get to visit, or know about.  I’ve been visiting, living on, and exploring Mount Desert Island and Acadia National Park for the past 43 years, and I’ve come across and explored some unique spots.  While I’m not ready to give out my secret fishing spots in Acadia, I will divulge some of its secret places worth a visit that you may not find on any trail map or guide.  Let’s go visit some of them.

 

 

Little Long Pond – Seal Harbor

While technically owned by the Rockefellers and not within the boundaries of the park, Little Long Pond in Seal Harbor is on the lists of places to visit and is enjoyed and photographed by thousands each year and although bicycles are not allowed, you can ride your horse, walk your dog off a leash, and enjoy the carriage trails and paths that surround the vicinity.   There are 3 beautiful fields there overlooking the pond and a magnificent boathouse.  Here are two of its secrets that most people don’t know.  From the gate, walk to the carriage road on your left keeping the pond on your right.  The carriage road goes over a brook at the edge of the pond before turning to the right and going up in elevation.  After you cross the brook look to your right and you will see an obscure path through the woods.  This path parallels the carriage road until you come out into the big field across from the boathouse.  The path continues across the field and enters the woods close to the water after you cross the field.   The trail leads up the side of the pond to Jordan stream, which flows into little long pond from Jordan Pond.   With all the people that visit here, you can feel remote on this trail, and I have never seen another soul.  Once you get to Jordan Stream, you can take a trail across the stream that leads back to the carriage road that goes along the right side of the pond. You can also continue straight and follow Jordan stream to the cobblestone bridge which is about halfway around the pond via carriage road and return via the left or right.

Another secret spot of little long pond is a bubbling spring.  You can find it by going straight at the entrance gate and following the right side of the pond.  You will pass the boathouse on your left, followed by the left turn to do the little loop that leads back to the boat house.   There is a second field on your left after you walk by the left had turn, and shortly you will come up to a small copse of trees on your left.  Follow the slope of the field down to the tree line and you will find nestled at the bottom a bubbling spring.  If you don’t see it immediately, walk to your left or right a little – it is tiled with a small brook running out of the top. Alternately you can get there by taking the path described above and going straight over Jordan Stream, taking a right when you come out onto the carriage road and finding the copse of trees on your right before coming to the intersection that will lead you straight to the gate, or taking a right and going to the gate via the boathouse.  You can then complete the loop and fishing back at the gate where you started.  The whole loop is about 3 miles.   The trail is lined in on the map below;

 

A handful of people a year hit a story on this blog by using the search terms Secrets of Acadia.  When I first thought about writing down some of  the secrets in Acadia that I have discovered over the years I thought about spending the winter putting them all into book form and either finding a publisher for it, or publishing it myself.  I’ve been thinking about it, and I think it makes more sense to publish it here.  When you the reader find it here on this obscure blog, it means you really want to know the Secrets of Acadia… you didn’t just think about it because you saw the book on a shelf.  And that means something to me, and it is the essence of sharing a secret.  I’m sharing it with you, and now it’s our secret.  Please guard it well and if this helped you in any way, if you visit and find the experience rewarding, please consider making a small donation below.

 

 

 

Secrets of Acadia Day Mountain Caves

Everyone that fishes has a secret spot where they go to fish.  A spot that they found on their own, or through a family member, that belongs to them and where nobody else goes.   Mine lies in the heart of Acadia National Park.   It was found by my Grandfather who showed my Dad how to get there, and when  I was old enough to go Dad took me.   It is also a magic spot.  I can go there today and bring home a fish for you.  It is also magic because my Dad brought me there, and told me to keep it a secret, which I have and still will.  The secret spot will never change, as it’s within a National Park.  It will be there, as it is now and as I know it now, until the end of time.  The spirit at this spot belongs to my family.

Acadia is one of the most visited National Parks, and as of 2007 was logging 2 million recreational visits per year.  With that many people visiting such a relatively small park, you would think that all of its secrets would be uncovered, but despite the multitude of maps and guidebooks, there are still places that few get to visit, or know about.  I’ve been visiting, living on, and exploring Mount Desert Island and Acadia National Park for the past 43 years, and I’ve come across and explored some unique spots.  While I’m not ready to give out my secret fishing spots in Acadia, I will divulge some of its secret places worth a visit that you may not find on any trail map or guide.  Let’s go visit some of them.

 

Day Mountain Caves – Seal Harbor

   Although it only rises ~583 feet above sea level, Day Mountain in Seal Harbor is a popular destination for visitors to Acadia, and holds one of it’s secrets.   There are several trails to reach the summit, most of which are on maps and a couple that aren’t.  One of the reasons Day Mountain is so popular is due to Wildwood Stables, which offer horse and carriage rides on the carriage road that leads to the top, and around the mountain.  They also offer camping and boarding for horses, so the carriage road has a lot of use between bikers, horse carriages, and hikers.

The secret of Day Mountain, which you won’t find on any map, are the caves.  Yes, there are two caves near the summit of Day Mountain, which are rarely visited, and not marked.  The easiest way to get there is beginning in Seal Harbor, head towards Bar Harbor on Route 3.  From the Post Office in Seal Harbor the parking area for the trailhead is about  1.1 miles.  You will head over a hill which is locally known as garage hill for the garage that used to be where the Acadia Corporation is now.  You will drive past Lower and Upper Dunbar on the left, Day Street on the left, and then  two more roads on your right. Just past the second road there is a sharp corner  to the left (again ~ 1.1 miles from the Post Office)  and a parking area on your right, which is the parking area for the trail, and saves you some of the climb of the mountain.  The trail head is across the road from the parking area.  The trail only goes for a short distance before bringing you to the carriage road that goes around the mountain.  Straight ahead of you is the carriage trail that goes up the mountain, and is the one to follow.  In about a half a mile, there is a left hand turn of the carriage road, and you will notice a gap in the coping stones on the right hand side.

  This is where the unmarked trail begins.  The trail is faint in places, but with some patience you should be able to find it.  The first cave is more of a chimney on the left, which used to have a ladder in it, and the last time I was there it had an old rope.  When the ladder was present it was possible to get to the top of the mountain through  the chimney.  The second cave is on the left as well, further down the trail from the chimney and ~ .10 miles from where you left the carriage trail.  I have not been far in, but have heard there is a sandy floored chamber at the end of tunnel from the entrance, and a tunnel that leads from that chamber.

A handful of people a year hit a story on this blog by using the search terms Secrets of Acadia.  When I first thought about writing down some of  the secrets in Acadia that I have discovered over the years I thought about spending the winter putting them all into book form and either finding a publisher for it, or publishing it myself.  I’ve been thinking about it, and I think it makes more sense to publish it here.  When you the reader find it here on this obscure blog, it means you really want to know the Secrets of Acadia… you didn’t just think about it because you saw the book on a shelf.  And that means something to me, and it is the essence of sharing a secret.  I’m sharing it with you, and now it’s our secret.  Please guard it well and if this helped you in any way, if you visit the caves and find the experience rewarding, please consider making a small donation below.


Another National Park for Maine?

I gently slid my hand over the photograph and stood in awe as I looked around, excited to be in the same building as my Great Uncle Felix Fernald had been during the romantic era of the Maine Northwoods Lumbermen.  Ok, he was actually a time-keeper there, but to my young imagination he was a river runner, riding down the rivers on the log drives of the spring and living the high life of a Maine woodsman and he had worked in the very building I was now standing in.

I was on a Boy Scout canoeing and camping trip,it was my first time exploring the North Woods of Maine, and we were at Seboomook High Adventure Base at Pittston Farm which is now a motel, restaurant and camping area.   But back then, it was my gateway to the Maine woods, and as we paddled down the west branch of the Penobscot River and went over Roll dam in just a lifejacket, the lure of Northern Maine was born in me, and that week we explored the river I was a river driver on the spring freshet.

 

Going over Roll Dam - West Branch Penobscot

I have explored a lot of Northern Maine since that day, and one of the things I have always enjoyed is looking for bits of it’s history, especially it’s logging history.  I was fascinated with the locomotives and the tramway on the Allagash River and I especially enjoyed reading about the hermit on Chesuncook Lake, which I wrote about in The Chesuncook Lake Gun.   Northern Maine is timeless history…it is the same as it always was.

What images does Northern Maine conjure up for you?   Maine has always been a state of rough wilderness with people known for their self reliance, individuality, ruggedness, and a sense of independence.  People come here to experience the rougher end of wilderness living.  The adventures people have in Maine are chronicled in countless books and magazines.  A wilderness experience is what Northern Maine is all about, and that experience  for most includes some sort of “traditional use”.

When it comes to the people of Maine, you hear the words “traditional use” a lot.  But what does traditional use really mean?  For me, it has it’s origins from an unwritten Wilderness code of ethics among early woodsmen which basically stated that – my cabin is unlocked.  Should you find yourself in need of it for the night, please use it.  Replace the firewood that you use.  Leave food if you can, and leave it in as good or better condition than you found it.  Those were the beginnings of traditional use.   And to some extent it still exists today.  It’s funny, when I bought property in Greenbush, there were 9 lots that were for sale, about 40 acres each.  Within a short amount of time, 7 lots had no trespassing signs on them, and two did not.  Guess which lots were purchased by Mainers.  My property there will, as long as I live, remain unposted, and it made me happy a few years ago to hear a brace of beagles in the cedar bog on the lower end of the property chasing a rabbit.   Also, Maine still has the rather unique rule that if property is not posted, then a person has the right to access it, unless asked to leave by the landowner.  Folks not from here sometimes have a problem grasping that.  Traditional use also means  access for hunting, fishing,trapping, and in later years snowmobiling.

The paper companies including Great Northern  understood the woodsman rules and traditional access and left there land open to it.  You could do pretty much whatever you wanted, as long as you stayed out of the way of the logging trucks.  I have a picture somewhere of me standing under the trailer of one of the Great Northern tandem wood haulers on the Golden Road – truly a leviathan of the woods.

Lately I fear for Maine and the changes that people are trying to make here to further their own agendas.  Maine has been dividing for some time across North and South boundaries….and the phrase The Two Maines is more meaningful than ever.  So, if you are reading this from a place south of Bangor, and have never visited Northern Maine  I challenge you to take a road trip – Visit the Allagash and St John – take the woods roads from Portage to Madawaska and see for yourself the vastness of the region.  Find out for yourself that it is open for everyone to use, whether you are a hunter, or a cross country skiier.

One of the changes that has been proposed off and on since the 193o’s is a Northern Maine National Park.  Northern Maine doesn’t need a National Park – why?  Because they already HAVE one – it’s called The North Maine Woods Inc.   Imagine!  Landowners working together to allow traditional access and traditional use – biking, hiking, skiing, hunting, ITS snowmobile trails, leases for your very own cabin, fishing, trapping, or just hanging out doing what you want.  THAT my friend is Democracy at it’s finest.  Landowners working together for the greater good of everybody.  Reasonable fees, maintained roads, boat launches.  It’s almost a utopia. And it WORKS.  If you haven’t been, you should visit before you ever make a decision in your mind about a National Park there.  Speaking of which, think about it -would you really want the increased regulation, increased law enforcement, and closure of traditional use and access??  Why would anybody want to change to that??

The latest person to want to change that is Roxanne Quimby, who has proposed a National Park on her property abutting Baxter State Park, which most people feel, as do I, should she be successful it will be a toe hold for the 3.2 million acre park that Restore has proposed.  Roxanne herself describes the approximately 60,000 acre parcel as a “seed”.   And yes, I at one time sported the bumper sticker that said Restore Boston – Leave Our Maine Way of Life Alone!  I think those stickers  should, and probably will be making a comeback here shortly.

And, I have a little secret to share with you that most people do not know about Baxter – One of the reasons  Governor Percival Baxter created Baxter State Park was to STOP IT FROM BECOMING A NATIONAL PARK.      Governor Baxter had the vision to know back in the 30’s that a National Park in that region was not the right thing to do.   Baxter Park is for the people of Maine.  And, if you are from Maine it is FREE TO ACCESS!!  Camping of course is a small fee per night.  I think I would be waiting a long time at the Acadia National Park tollbooth arguing that I should get in for free because I’m local.

And you know, I probably wouldn’t have a problem if Roxanne donated her parcel to Baxter Park – in fact, I would urge her to consider it if she is intent on preserving her piece of property.   Baxter is self sufficient, they do not take money from the state.  And guess what – Baxter State Park understands Traditonal Use.  That’s right, you are allowed to hunt in the north end of the Park.   Personally,  I could live with the changes that giving her parcel of land to Baxter would bring, and I would urge Roxanne to consider it, but she won’t because her goal is the 3.2 million acre National Park.

Why?  To use her words;   “I feel like my reason for being put on this earth will have been fulfilled because this ( a National Park in Maine) will live on after me. A park is a demonstration that there is something in America that I can love.”

That is why she wants a National Park – to be famous and to be remembered.  Another George Dorr if you will.  She wants a legacy which sadly will only be the division and turmoil that she has brought to the people of Maine with this issue, whether she succeeds or not.

Further – I find it extremely ironic that, to use her words, “To me, ownership and private property were the beginning of the end in this country. Once the Europeans came in, drawing lines and dividing things up, things started getting exploited and over-consumed. But a park takes away the whole issue of ownership. It’s off the table; we all own it and we all share it. It’s so democratic.”

Seriously???  No really… Seriously???   From where I’m sitting, the North Maine Woods is open to me any time I want to visit, and to do whatever I want to do by a group of landowners working together..in DEMOCRACY.   The only person I see dividing lines, dividing things up, and closing access is Roxanne herself.  You can see what some of her property closure looks like here,  And a lot more information regarding Roxanne here.

A National Park in no way takes away the issue of ownership.  It means the Federal government owns it.  The Federal Government that can’t run any program successfully, that is mired in debt, and can’t even balance a budget.  That’s who you want owning more land in Maine?  I surely don’t.

Briefly, here are the reasons I think that another National Park  in Maine is a ludicrous idea;

-first and foremost, traditional uses would be eliminated.  Snowmobiling alone added 300 million + in sales tax revenue to the state.   From the Bangor Daily News 11/23/11;

Bob Meyers, executive director of the Maine Snowmobile Association, said snowmobiling in Maine is a $300 million to $350 million business responsible for 23,000 jobs statewide.

That doesn’t include the tax figures on hunting supplies and income from other traditional access.  Any income generated by a National Park will go out of state to the Feds, just like in Acadia.

– The tax base.  Putting that land into the hands of the Feds means taxes are going to go up for Piscataquis county, and more counties if the larger National Park is successful.

– Lost Economy from the woods industry.  Personally I don’t believe Millinocket is down and out yet.  In the current economy we’re all suffering, and I think an interested buyer will eventually get the mills up there running again, and profitable.  (Note that since first writing this post, someone has bought the mills and put them back in operation).  To use the statistics from the Maine Woods Coalition website;

Maine Department of Conservation Commissioner Ron Lovaglio stated at the Maine Woods Conservation Easement Forum that the wood products extracted from the 3.2 million acres of forestland in the Maine North Woods adds approximately $986,000,000 to the Maine economy each year through wages and sales of products and services. According to the Maine Office of Tourism, the typical overnight visitor to our region spends $85/day. To make up for the loss of productivity of locking up 3.2 million acres of forestland, a National Park would have to bring 11.6 million ADDITIONAL tourists to the region. Nothing the woods industry has ever done would have a greater impact to the rural character of Piscataquis County (population roughly 17,000) than such an increase in tourism. Commissioner Lovaglio wondered aloud how big the tollbooth would have to be in Kittery. In Greenville, we wonder how big the mound of trash will be each day at the rest area just outside of Town).

And I wonder how on earth you would get that many tourists to come to the region.  Acadia attracts only 3 million per year and is one of the top visited Parks in the Nation.  And lets face it, in the area Roxanne has proposed, what exactly is there that a tourist may want to see?  I’ve lived a stone’s throw from Acadia National Park for most of my life, and it’s ACADIA  – there are the carriage roads, vistas, Cadillac Mountain, Thunder Hole, lobsters, Bar Harbor…the tourist draw list for the region is endless.  Acadia would be an attraction for tourists whether there was a Park here on not.  Bar Harbor would be successful just like Camden or Rockland because of what we have here.  Baxter is successful because of it’s uniqueness too – Katahdin of course being the biggest draw and the other unique mountains.  What does Roxanne’s  property, a working forest,  have to offer that anyone would want to come see?  People come there to hunt, fish and snowmobile…and use as timberland.  Which a National Park would stop.  In addition, Baxter Park and The Allagash have been showing  a decline in users for some time now.  A National Park isn’t going to stop that trend when there is nothing unusual or unique.  There is certainly nothing there to compete with Baxter or Acadia.

And lets face it – any jobs brought to the area will be seasonal, just like they are here in Acadia.  There are plenty of people here that struggle in the winter.  Hence the old Bar Harbor joke – I landed here a number of years ago and never made enough money to leave.

In addition – the State Legislature has adopted a resolution against a feasibility study;

JOINT RESOLUTION MEMORIALIZING THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES, THE UNITED STATES SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR AND THE UNITED STATES CONGRESS TO OPPOSE THE CREATION OF A NATIONAL PARK IN MAINE’S NORTH WOODS

WE, your Memorialists, the Members of the One Hundred and Twenty-fifth Legislature of the State of Maine now assembled in the First Regular Session, most respectfully present and petition the President of the United States, the United States Secretary of the Interior and the United States Congress as follows: WHEREAS, Maine residents and visitors enjoy the privilege of using large tracts of private land in the north woods for recreational uses such as snowmobiling, hunting, hiking, fishing, bird watching and other activities; and WHEREAS, the future of that private land is of great importance to the people of Maine and their outdoor heritage; and WHEREAS, the Maine Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife and many of the large landowners have entered or are entering into cooperative wildlife management agreements that ensure the future of deer yards and other critical wildlife habitat in the north woods; and WHEREAS, state agencies, private landowners and nonprofit organizations are cooperating in an unprecedented effort to secure permanent rights of access to the north woods and keep valuable recreational property and natural habitat undeveloped through conservation easements; and WHEREAS, federal ownership or control of the north woods would create many problems including limitations on timber supply to the forest products industry, reduced recreational access and loss of local and state control of these areas; now, therefore, be it RESOLVED: That We, your Memorialists, oppose the creation of a national park in Maine’s north woods and request that the President of the United States and Secretary of the Interior Kenneth Salazar deny requests to conduct a feasibility study concerning establishing a national park in Maine’s north woods; and be it further RESOLVED: That suitable copies of this resolution, duly authenticated by the Secretary of State, be transmitted to the Honorable Barack H. Obama, President of the United States, to the Secretary of the Interior, Kenneth Salazar, to the President of the United States Senate, to the Speaker of the United States House of Representatives and to each Member of the Maine Congressional Delegation.

 

And the Millinocket Town council has weighed in as well;

WHEREAS, Maine’s working forest has been the major economic force in northern Maine for over 400 years and is Maine’s leading industry; and,

WHEREAS, the creation of a national park in this part of the State would effectively eliminate a large portion of the forest products industry, cause a major collapse of the area’s economic base, and force the relocation of thousands of people needing new employment; and,

WHEREAS, Baxter State Park was created by former Governor Percival Baxter in part to thwart efforts in the 1930s to develop a national park in the area and his park has served this area well without the undue intrusion a national park and its regulations would cause; and,

WHEREAS, there are no outstanding characteristics or unique attractions outside Baxter to justify creation of a national park here; and,

WHEREAS, the private ownership of land and the public use of land is a Maine tradition and way of life worthy of preserving; and,

WHEREAS, the vast majority of people in this area clearly do not support such a national park;

NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED, that the Millinocket Town Council officially re-affirms the Town’s opposition to the creation of a new national park in northern Maine, and,

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that the Millinocket Town Council requests the Governor of Maine to affirm and the Members of the Maine Congressional Delegation to re-affirm their opposition to such a national park.

In my mind no means no.  But this issue is not going to go away you can be sure of that, and outside interests along with outside money will be here soon to champion it.

 

There is a lot to the National Park proposal story that you may not have thought about – educate yourself – please.  Join or at least investigate the Maine Woods Coalition – look at their links page.  Think about who has made statements against a National Park and why – what are their motivations?  What is Roxanne’s motivation?  Why wouldn’t she consider giving the land to Baxter?  Who do you think really has Maine’s best interest at heart?  Certainly Governor Baxter did.

Sign up for Dont fence me in.  Read about Percival Baxter’s wild and free vision and realize he had the vision to know a National Park was a bad idea.  Support the idea that those who close access to their property  should pay higher taxes.    Don’t fall for a narcissists’ agenda, or the minions that have. Look at Roxanne’s past actions including taking her business and jobs out of state.   We can and will weather this, just as we as Mainers, have since the 30’s.  Seriously think about it, and think about who has Maine’s best interest in mind.

Update 11/9/11 – I’m not sure how much clearer it can get than this;

EAST MILLINOCKET, Maine — Voters overwhelmingly opposed a National Park Service feasibility study of Roxanne Quimby’s proposed 70,000-acre national park, voting 513-132 against the idea in unofficial totals compiled late Tuesday, Town Clerk Erica Ingalls said.

 

 

Biking Acadia Hadlock Pond Loop

One of the fun things about Acadia National Park is all of the carriage trails available to bicycle on.   A favorite of mine is the Upper Hadlock Pond Loop.  The are two parking lots that you can start from; one at the top of the hill just outside of Northeast Harbor before you reach Upper Hadlock Pond, and the other at the top of the hill just past Upper Hadlock Pond.  The loop essentially connects both parking lots and has a lower road close  to the pond, and an upper road along the ridge above the pond.   My personal favorite is to start at the one at the top of the hill just outside of Northeast.  When you get to the top of the loop, instead of taking the right to head back along the ridge you can take a left and head up Parkman Mountain – there are some great views and when you get to the top, you can turn around and have a great downhill ride back to where you started, passing straight through the intersection this time.   The trip takes a hour or less depending on how fast you go – I took a short video coming down the mountain today – at the end of the video you would take a right to head back to your car.

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360 view overlooking Somes Sound

 

 

 

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